1 comment on “10 New England Chef-Favorites
 

10 New England Chef-Favorites
 

So many choices, so little time – that’s the quandary always faced when dining out in New England. Since Chef Instructor Annie B. Copps is a proud Boston native and her recommendations last time around were so popular, we sat down with her again to get the scoop on more of her favorites. A talented and passionate chef, Annie studied under Jacques Pépin at Boston University and has worked amongst such Boston culinary elite as Julia Childs and Todd English. Now she delights in sharing her culinary expertise in The Culinary Center on board Marina and Riviera.

Read on for some New England culinary inspiration with a few of Chef Annie’s favorite choices in New York, Newport and Boston.

 

New York

Carmine’s
This big, loud Italian spot in Times Square dishes up big portions of all the classic pasta dishes – you can’t go wrong.

The Modern
The restaurant at Museum of Modern Art (MOMA) is one of my favorites – it leans towards French, but the food is creative and well, “modern.”

The Union Square Market
Leading the revolution of reinvigorating the concept of local farmer’s markets in the city, this market remains a beautiful and vibrant community gathering place.

 

Newport

Castle Hill Inn
Few things are better than the outstanding view from The Lawn at Castle Hill, from which you can see boats of all shapes and sizes sail pass while enjoying classic clam chowder or a refreshing glass of rosé.

Mamma Luisa
The name and the décor suggest an old-fashioned Italian dining experience. Don’t be fooled –there are certainly pasta classics, and they’re perfectly executed, but the kitchen also creates updated plates with a terrific Italian wine list to match.

Midtown Oyster Bar
This classic spot offers three floors of simple but thoughtful seafood-centric foods with a consistently wide range of New England oyster options, from Maine to Connecticut.

 

Boston

Faneuil Hall Marketplace
Not far from the North End is Faneuil Hall Marketplace, a historic building morphed into a food hall and crafts market, plus the newly built Boston Public Market, which is an excellent food and dining spot dedicated to local food producers.

Nebo
Sisters Christine and Carla have a mega-hit Italian restaurant that is a popular spot for the neighborhood – it’s hard to beat and there’s a serious after-work bar scene.

Sportello and Menton
Award-winning chef Barbara Lynch has seven or more dining spots throughout Boston. Sportello and Menton showcase her ability to create beautiful and delicious food at each end of the spectrum. Sportello is casual Italian food served at a long counter, while Menton is a magnificent culinary experience that requires your full attention and all senses.

We look forward to seeing you in New England this spring and summer!

1 comment on “Street Food in Sicily: Arancini Recipe”

Street Food in Sicily: Arancini Recipe

By Executive Chef & Director of Culinary Enrichment Kathryn Kelly

Several years ago, I was strolling the beautiful streets of Taormina and I happened to stop for a coffee and breakfast snack when I discovered these beautiful caramel-colored rice balls. I decided to sample one, and discovered from the shop owner that the rice balls, arancini, are a traditional way Italians use leftover rice and risotto.

1 comment on “4 Unforgettable Culinary Moments in Liguria”

4 Unforgettable Culinary Moments in Liguria

By Culinary Enrichment Director & Executive Chef Kathryn Kelly

One of my favorite places to travel to in Italy is the Ligurian coast. Nestled between the Mediterranean coastline and the majestic Alps, Liguria is a darling of Italian culinary aficionados and its dishes celebrate both the mountains and the sea. Known as “the land of pesto,” Liguria is home to the fragrant “green gold” of the region, aromatic pesto. Genovese basil, creamy pine nuts and fresh garlic combine with fragrant olive oil to create this treasured staple of Liguria. Here are my favorite moments from our popular Culinary Discovery Tour available from Portofino: Chef Market Tour, Pesto, Pasta & Lunch.

1 comment on “Guest Post: Stories Behind Caribbean Beer Names”

Guest Post: Stories Behind Caribbean Beer Names

By Sandy Cares

When you’re island-hopping from one beautiful coastline to the next during a Caribbean cruise, ever wonder about all of those funny Caribbean beer names? What do they mean, anyway? As it turns out, the names of the popular Caribbean brews, ales, pilsners, bocks and lagers are steeped in facets of those islands’ traditions, cultures and surrounding nature.

Carib Beer, for example, is brewed in Trinidad and Tobago as well as St. Kitts and Grenada.  The name honors the Caribs, the indigenous people of those islands. In fact, the entire Caribbean Sea is named for the Caribs.

blog_post_8-10-16_beerMeanwhile, Aruba’s pilsner, Balashi, is named after an abandoned gold smelt. Early Spanish explorers chalked up Aruba as useless because its thin, dry soil didn’t produce much more than cacti and they saw no hope for gold. But long after the Spanish left, a young boy saw something glitter as he led his donkey across a dry riverbed – gold! Soon a couple of smelts went up, and one was named Balashi.

Another indigenous beer name is Antigua’s Wadadli, of which the exact meaning is lost to history. It is an alternative name for Antigua, and is seen on restaurants, shops, product labels and tourist services.

Kalik beer, the Bahamian lager of choice, certainly sounds like an indigenous word but it is actually the sound of a bell. Cowbells are part of the elaborate head-to-toe costumes donned by celebrants during their yearly “Jonkonnu” festival in the Bahamas. Dancers start at midnight and continue through the next afternoon to greet the New Year clicking – or kaliking – their bells.

Some Caribbean beer names are nature-inspired, like Cayman Islands’ Ironshore bock, which alludes to that tough, ship-shredding limestone that we can all blame for having to tender while in Grand Cayman. Dominica’s Kubuli beer is another great example of this – it comes from the island’s indigenous name, Wai’ Ti Kubuli, meaning “Tall is her body,” which describes the island’s high volcanic peaks.

Piton is a St. Lucian pilsner aptly named for the commanding twin Pitons – those spectacular volcanic cones that not only are a UNESCO World Heritage site, but also the undisputed symbol of St. Lucia.

Even the Maya are represented in a local Caribbean beer. Every label of Belize’s Belikin beer features Altun Ha, one of Belize’s renowned Mayan ruins. But if you ask the locals how their beer came to be called Belikin, they’ll just say it’s because when they drink it, they be likin’ it!

I hope to see many of you in the Caribbean soon! Escape the chilly fall and winter weather with me on one of these sailings:

Regatta | November 17, 2016
Miami to Miami, 12 Days

Regatta | November 29, 2016
Miami to Miami, 23 Days

Regatta | December 22, 2016
Miami to Miami, 16 Days

1 comment on “Montevideo Culinary Experience: Asado & Artesana Winery”

Montevideo Culinary Experience: Asado & Artesana Winery

When many think of Uruguayan cuisine, one iconic element comes to mind: the asado,  or barbecue – with a glass of wine, of course. But this great culinary tradition is so much more than just barbecue and wine; it represents the whole country’s identity. Barbecue is one of the most strongly rooted customs in this region of South America and is a symbol of celebration, friendship and family.