0 comments on “Thanksgiving Recipe: Tuscan-Style Turkey Porchetta”

Thanksgiving Recipe: Tuscan-Style Turkey Porchetta

By Executive Chef Kathryn Kelly

This recipe is one that was inspired from the many meals I’ve enjoyed in the heart of Tuscany. I love this recipe for Thanksgiving or a special harvest dish during autumn. When I serve this on a bed of polenta with a glass of Chianti, I transport myself back to a little farmhouse in Chiusa where I first experimented with this dish.

I prefer to leave the skin on the turkey breast, as it enhances the flavor immensely, but you can certainly prepare it without the skin if you wish. You may want to add a touch of butter or pecorino cheese to the prepared polenta for additional flavor. Originally a chicken recipe that I adapted for Thanksgiving, you can certainly choose to prepare it with chicken breasts – either way, I can promise you the evidence of your efforts won’t last very long. My guests always rave about this dish! 

 Serves 4

Ingredients

Stuffing
½ cup grated celeriac
½ cup grated parsnip
¼ cup chopped toasted walnuts
2 tablespoons dried cranberries, softened in hot water
1 tablespoon finely chopped sage
1 tablespoon finely chopped rosemary
2 teaspoons minced garlic
1 teaspoon truffle oil

Turkey
4 boneless, skinless turkey breasts
8 slices prosciutto

Sage Butter
3 tablespoons butter
8 sage leaves

Directions

Mix the Stuffing
In a medium bowl, combine all ingredients and mix well.

Prepare the Turkey
Preheat the oven to 350°F/177°C. Place each turkey breast, one at a time, in a large zip-lock bag and gently pound to a thickness of ½ inch.

On a work surface lined with parchment paper, lay out the prosciutto in 4 stacks of 2 pieces each. Place a turkey breast on top of each prosciutto stack, making sure the ends of the breasts are within the ends of the prosciutto. Place one-fourth of the stuffing on each breast. Roll the turkey and prosciutto tightly around the stuffing. Place the rolled turkey, seam side down, in a baking pan. Bake until the turkey reaches an internal temperature of 162°F/72°C.

Infuse the Butter
In a small sauté pan over medium heat, melt the butter. Add the sage and infuse the butter for about 5 minutes. Remove the sage and reserve for garnish.

To Serve
Drizzle with sage butter and garnish with sage leaves. Try pairing this turkey with creamy polenta with cranberries, and enjoy!

 

0 comments on “How To Eat Your Way Through the South Pacific
 

How To Eat Your Way Through the South Pacific
 

French Polynesia serves up a bevy of mouthwatering specialties, exotic dishes and delicious delicacies – and one of the best ways to delve into the local island culture is through food. Whether you’re exploring Bora Bora and Moorea or Nuku Hiva and Tahiti, the flavors of these islands are meant to be savored. Here’s our guide on what not to miss when it comes to trying local foods and South Pacific culinary experiences.


Try the region’s many iterations of
poisson cru: French Polynesia’s version of ceviche, this dish features local raw fish marinated in coconut milk and lime juice, often with vegetables. You’ll have plenty of chances to try it on a variety of excursions, such as motu picnics, and you’ll see it on local menus everywhere.


Visit a vanilla plantation:
You can do this when you visit Raiatea since more than 70% of the vanilla grown in French Polynesia is from the nearby island of Taha’a. Here you’ll learn about the intricate hand pollination process and have a chance to see fragrant vanilla pods curing in the sun. You’ll soon understand why Tahitian vanilla is so precious – It takes nearly two years for a vanilla vine to grow and produce flowers, which then produce a sole vanilla pod. You’ll have a whole new appreciation for the vanilla sauce that’s drizzled over your mahi mahi or po’e.

Be adventurous when it comes to seafood: On islands like Nuku Hiva, you’ll have the chance to taste mama, raw clam-like mollusks usually prepared in coconut and lime juice; toetoe river crabs and other seafood you might not normally. In Tahiti, you’ll see exotic lagoon and deep-sea fish such as sea urchin, parrotfish and barracuda on menus.

Have lunch at Bloody Mary’s in Bora Bora: a bit of an institution in Bora Bora, the thatched-roof restaurant has served everyone from Jimmy Buffet and Ron Wood of The Rolling Stones to Goldie Hawn and Kurt Russell. With your feet resting on the sand floors, try their mahi mahi burger and a mai tai – it’s an experience to remember.

Don’t pass on the breadfruit: Called uru in Tahitian, this strangely versatile starch will appear on the table prepared in more ways than you keep track of and is quintessentially French Polynesian. Fried, mashed, boiled, roasted, broiled…you’ll likely come across them all. A staple form on Nuku Hiva involves roasting it over hot coals and then mashing it with coconut milk to create a dish called kaka.

Stroll the daily market in Utoroa, Raiatea: Avocado, coconut, bananas, passion fruit overflow from the stalls. Pause to sample fresh rambutans, pomelos and pineapple. Venture upstairs too if you have time – you’ll find more stalls filled with jewelry, pareos, fragrant bottles of coconut oil, vanilla sugar and the like.

Inspired to sail away to the dreamy South Pacific? Have a look at these top voyages.

 

 

0 comments on “Top 10 Ways to Meet & Mingle with Fellow Guests
 

Top 10 Ways to Meet & Mingle with Fellow Guests
 

Once you are on board, it’s time to relax and get to know your new home. Below are our guests’ favorite ways to socialize with fellow cruisers on board and meet new travel friends during their voyage. Next time you are on board, we invite you to try a few new spots and activities to meet and socialize with other guests.

1. Enjoy cocktails at The Grand Bar.

2. Socialize at the Captain’s Welcome Party.

3. Join a hands-on cooking class at The Culinary Center.

4. Play Team Trivia & Brainteaser Trivia.

5. Gather with friends for fresh illy® coffee at Baristas.

6. Meet fellow creative travelers at Artist Loft.

7. Participate in bridge lessons & tournaments.

8. Spend an evening at the Casino.

9. Practice your swing on the Sports Deck.

10. Unwind with cocktails during jazz nights at Martinis.

What’s your favorite way to mingle with other guests on board? Share it below or in the comments on Facebook!

0 comments on “Recipe: Tom Kha Gai (Thai Chicken Coconut Soup)
 

Recipe: Tom Kha Gai (Thai Chicken Coconut Soup)
 

Tom Kha Gai Soup

This quintessential Thai chicken coconut soup is a deliciously aromatic accompaniment to any meal with an Asian flair or a complete meal on its own. This soup is served in Red Ginger, our Asian restaurant on board, and you can learn this recipe and other Thai, Vietnamese and Japanese favorites from this restaurant during our “Most Requested Red Ginger” class at The Culinary Center on Marina and Riviera.

According to Chef Kathryn Kelly, Executive Chef & Director of Culinary Enrichment, Thai cuisine is best characterized as complex, balanced, fresh and spicy – and this classic chicken and coconut soup brings that description to life with fresh lemongrass, lime juice, coconut milk, Thai chilies and galangal – which is also known as Thai ginger and is in the ginger family, but the flavor is markedly more citrusy and earthy.

Tom Khai Gai Soup

Thai Chicken Coconut Soup (Tom Kha Gai)

Serves 6

16 cups low-sodium chicken stock
3 stalks lemongrass, mashed
1 cup coarsely chopped galangal
8 kaffir lime leaves
2 Thai chilies
6 boneless chicken breasts
1 cup coconut milk
1 teaspoon fish sauce
2 cups straw mushroom pieces
18 cherry tomatoes, halved
Juice of 3 to 5 limes
18 cilantro leaves

In a large stockpot over medium heat, combine the chicken stock, lemongrass, galangal, lime leaves and chilies and simmer until the stock reduces by half, about 1½ to 2 hours. Decrease the heat to low, add the chicken and poach to an internal temperature of 165°F/74°C. Remove the chicken, let cool and shred. Strain the stock through a fine mesh strainer lined with cheesecloth.

Return the stock to the stockpot over medium heat, reheat the stock and add the coconut milk and fish sauce. Divide the shredded chicken, mushroom pieces and cherry tomatoes among 6 bowls. Just before serving, stir the lime juice into the stock, adjusting the amount to taste. Divide the stock among the bowls, garnish each with cilantro leaves and enjoy!

1 comment on “10 New England Chef-Favorites
 

10 New England Chef-Favorites
 

So many choices, so little time – that’s the quandary always faced when dining out in New England. Since Chef Instructor Annie B. Copps is a proud Boston native and her recommendations last time around were so popular, we sat down with her again to get the scoop on more of her favorites. A talented and passionate chef, Annie studied under Jacques Pépin at Boston University and has worked amongst such Boston culinary elite as Julia Childs and Todd English. Now she delights in sharing her culinary expertise in The Culinary Center on board Marina and Riviera.

Read on for some New England culinary inspiration with a few of Chef Annie’s favorite choices in New York, Newport and Boston.

 

New York

Carmine’s
This big, loud Italian spot in Times Square dishes up big portions of all the classic pasta dishes – you can’t go wrong.

The Modern
The restaurant at Museum of Modern Art (MOMA) is one of my favorites – it leans towards French, but the food is creative and well, “modern.”

The Union Square Market
Leading the revolution of reinvigorating the concept of local farmer’s markets in the city, this market remains a beautiful and vibrant community gathering place.

 

Newport

Castle Hill Inn
Few things are better than the outstanding view from The Lawn at Castle Hill, from which you can see boats of all shapes and sizes sail pass while enjoying classic clam chowder or a refreshing glass of rosé.

Mamma Luisa
The name and the décor suggest an old-fashioned Italian dining experience. Don’t be fooled –there are certainly pasta classics, and they’re perfectly executed, but the kitchen also creates updated plates with a terrific Italian wine list to match.

Midtown Oyster Bar
This classic spot offers three floors of simple but thoughtful seafood-centric foods with a consistently wide range of New England oyster options, from Maine to Connecticut.

 

Boston

Faneuil Hall Marketplace
Not far from the North End is Faneuil Hall Marketplace, a historic building morphed into a food hall and crafts market, plus the newly built Boston Public Market, which is an excellent food and dining spot dedicated to local food producers.

Nebo
Sisters Christine and Carla have a mega-hit Italian restaurant that is a popular spot for the neighborhood – it’s hard to beat and there’s a serious after-work bar scene.

Sportello and Menton
Award-winning chef Barbara Lynch has seven or more dining spots throughout Boston. Sportello and Menton showcase her ability to create beautiful and delicious food at each end of the spectrum. Sportello is casual Italian food served at a long counter, while Menton is a magnificent culinary experience that requires your full attention and all senses.

We look forward to seeing you in New England this spring and summer!