0 comments on “Recipe: Pomelo Banh Trang Rolls
 

Recipe: Pomelo Banh Trang Rolls
 

By Executive Chef & Director of Culinary Enrichment Kathryn Kelly

These fresh spring rolls are perfect for the last hot days of summer. Similar to rolling sushi, the assembly of these rolls is fun and easy. You need slightly damp hands to keep the rice paper from sticking to your fingers. I’ve put my own twist on the Vietnamese banh trang rolls we serve at Red Ginger, and you can easily experiment with different ingredients and create your own version at home.

Serves 4

MIANG DIPPING SAUCE
1 cup palm sugar
½ cup water
1 Thai chili
¼ cup coconut flakes, toasted
¼ cup crushed macadamia nuts
1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
2 teaspoons ginger juice

POMELO ROLLS
Segments of 4 pomelos
¼ cup coconut flakes, toasted
¼ cup salted dry-roasted peanuts, finely crushed
2 tablespoons finely minced shallot
8 Thai basil leaves, chiffonade
8 mint leaves, chiffonade
8 rice paper rounds
8 butter lettuce leaves
8 chive stems

MAKE THE SAUCE
In a small saucepan over medium heat, combine the sugar, water and chili and warm, stirring occasionally, until the sugar dissolves. Remove from the heat and stir in the remaining ingredients. Let cool and divide among 4 small bowls.

PREPARE THE ROLLS
In a medium bowl, combine the pomelo segments, coconut, peanuts, shallot, basil and mint. Soak a rice
paper in lukewarm water until soft and then lay out on a damp kitchen towel. Top with a lettuce leaf and one-eighth of the pomelo mixture. Roll up the rice paper like a burrito or gather up the edges to form a pouch. Tie with a chive stem. Repeat to make 8 rolls and serve with the dipping sauce.

0 comments on “Recipe: South Pacific-Style Coconut Ice Cream
 

Recipe: South Pacific-Style Coconut Ice Cream
 

There’s nothing like ice cream with a tropical flair to cool you down on a hot summer day. This creamy coconut ice cream recipe gets its inspiration from the gorgeous South Pacific islands where coconuts reign supreme and infuse the cuisine with that irresistibly sweet, rich and aromatic flavor. For this recipe, be sure to use cream of coconut and not coconut milk – the islanders would not be happy with you!

CREAMY COCONUT ICE CREAM
Makes 1 quart

INGREDIENTS
1 cup whole milk
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup cream of coconut
1 cup sweetened coconut, freshly flaked
1 cinnamon stick
8 egg yolks
1 ½ cups extra fine sugar
¼ cup toasted coconut flakes

PREPARATION
Bring milk, heavy cream, cream of coconut and coconut flakes to a simmer in a heavy saucepan. Add the cinnamon stick and allow to steep for 10 minutes. Return to low heat and hold.

Whisk the egg yolks and sugar together until the sugar dissolves. Temper the warm milk mixture into the egg yolks, adding a small amount at a time. Return the mixture to the saucepan and stir constantly over low heat until it thickens. Strain through a chinois to remove the cinnamon stick and coconut flakes. Chill over an ice bath. Place in an ice cream machine and churn until you reach the desired consistency. Top with toasted coconut flakes.

0 comments on “Recipe: Caribbean Macadamia-Crusted Fish with Banana Chutney”

Recipe: Caribbean Macadamia-Crusted Fish with Banana Chutney

By Executive Chef & Director of Culinary Enrichment Kathryn Kelly

There is something magical about the turquoise waters of the tropics and the luscious, abundant ingredients that suggest casual, soulful food. That’s the inspiration behind our culinary classes during the Caribbean season. The tropical fish, herbs, fruits, and spices in the Caribbean are the perfect combination to create seasonal, sustainable farm-to-table cuisine. And there’s nothing like the fresh, distinct and complex cuisine of the tropics for summer gatherings and balmy evenings on the patio. I hope you enjoy this deliciously aromatic Caribbean-style fish!

SERVES 4

CHUTNEY
2 ripe bananas
½ cup sultana raisins, plumped in 1 tablespoon hot water
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
Pinch of allspice

SAUCE
1 cup heavy coconut cream
1 to 2 teaspoons red curry paste

FISH
2 cups pulverized macadamia nuts
½ cup panko breadcrumbs
½ cup unsweetened coconut flakes
1 cup rice flour
2 egg whites, beaten
4 (6-ounce) fish fillets (such as snapper, grouper, cod or halibut), room temperature
Clarified butter or peanut oil, for frying

MAKE THE CHUTNEY
In a medium bowl, mash the bananas until smooth. Stir in the raisins, lime juice and allspice. Cover and reserve.

PREPARE THE SAUCE
In a small saucepan over medium heat, whisk together the coconut cream and red curry paste, adjusting the curry to taste. Warm through and then remove from the heat.

PAN FRY THE FISH
Prepare a sheet pan with an elevated wire rack. In a small bowl, combine the macadamia nuts, breadcrumbs and coconut flakes and mix well. Set up a breading station with 3 shallow bowls – one each for the flour, egg and nut mix. Pat the fish fillets dry and dip each in flour, then egg and then nut mix, fully coating them. Place on the prepared pan and let rest for 10 to 30 minutes.

In a large sauté pan over medium-high heat, add enough butter or oil to reach half the height of the fish. Heat the fat until a breadcrumb sizzles when added to the pan. Using tongs, carefully place each fillet in the pan and cook, turning once, until golden brown on both sides. Transfer onto paper towels to drain.

TO SERVE
Divide the chutney between 4 plates. Top each with a fish fillet and serve the red curry sauce on the side.

0 comments on “Recipe: Tom Kha Gai (Thai Chicken Coconut Soup)
 

Recipe: Tom Kha Gai (Thai Chicken Coconut Soup)
 

Tom Kha Gai Soup

This quintessential Thai chicken coconut soup is a deliciously aromatic accompaniment to any meal with an Asian flair or a complete meal on its own. This soup is served in Red Ginger, our Asian restaurant on board, and you can learn this recipe and other Thai, Vietnamese and Japanese favorites from this restaurant during our “Most Requested Red Ginger” class at The Culinary Center on Marina and Riviera.

According to Chef Kathryn Kelly, Executive Chef & Director of Culinary Enrichment, Thai cuisine is best characterized as complex, balanced, fresh and spicy – and this classic chicken and coconut soup brings that description to life with fresh lemongrass, lime juice, coconut milk, Thai chilies and galangal – which is also known as Thai ginger and is in the ginger family, but the flavor is markedly more citrusy and earthy.

Tom Khai Gai Soup

Thai Chicken Coconut Soup (Tom Kha Gai)

Serves 6

16 cups low-sodium chicken stock
3 stalks lemongrass, mashed
1 cup coarsely chopped galangal
8 kaffir lime leaves
2 Thai chilies
6 boneless chicken breasts
1 cup coconut milk
1 teaspoon fish sauce
2 cups straw mushroom pieces
18 cherry tomatoes, halved
Juice of 3 to 5 limes
18 cilantro leaves

In a large stockpot over medium heat, combine the chicken stock, lemongrass, galangal, lime leaves and chilies and simmer until the stock reduces by half, about 1½ to 2 hours. Decrease the heat to low, add the chicken and poach to an internal temperature of 165°F/74°C. Remove the chicken, let cool and shred. Strain the stock through a fine mesh strainer lined with cheesecloth.

Return the stock to the stockpot over medium heat, reheat the stock and add the coconut milk and fish sauce. Divide the shredded chicken, mushroom pieces and cherry tomatoes among 6 bowls. Just before serving, stir the lime juice into the stock, adjusting the amount to taste. Divide the stock among the bowls, garnish each with cilantro leaves and enjoy!

0 comments on “Dark ‘n’ Stormy: An Insider’s Look at Bermuda’s Classic Drink”

Dark ‘n’ Stormy: An Insider’s Look at Bermuda’s Classic Drink

What better island-style cocktail to enjoy while in Bermuda than a delightfully spicy and slightly sweet rum cocktail known as a Dark ‘n’ Stormy? With more than a 150-year history, Bermuda’s unofficial national drink is as storied as they come. Here’s a glimpse into the fascinating history of this classic cocktail, along with the Dark ‘n’ Stormy recipe of record.

Turbulent Beginnings
In 1806, a chartered English clipper, Mercury, set out from Gravesend, Kent, England bound for America. After 91 days of struggling at sea, they managed to make it ashore to Bermuda. The helmsman’s name was James Gosling. Of course, the Goslings eventually became one of the most important families on the island and entered the rum business in 1857. After much experimentation, the Goslings arrived at the distinctive rum formula that would be favored by many in the centuries to come. For many years, it was sold from the barrel and called “Old Rum” for its smooth taste. During World War I, the rum was bottled in discarded Champagne bottles from the British Officers Mess, but with the corks newly sealed in black wax. People began asking for the rum with the black seal and thus, the name chose itself. Much later, a creative interpretation gave rise to the well-known label image of the black seal balancing a barrel on its nose.

Nautical Appeal
It was kismet then that ginger beer also happened to be produced on Bermuda by the British Royal Navy – perhaps due to ginger’s effectiveness at easing seasickness. As the story goes, one evening a bartender at the Royal Navy Officer’s Club decided to add a splash of Gosling’s new rum to their spicy homemade ginger beer. Legend has it that a sailor supposedly sipped it and remarked that the color of the drink looked like “the color of a cloud only a fool or a dead man would sail under.” And here the Dark ‘n’ Stormy was born – a favorite of all those in the global boating and sailing community and sea lovers ever since.
This Bermudian cocktail has been trademarked by Gosling’s Black Seal Rum – and yes, there are many wrong ways to make a Dark ‘n’ Stormy. Below is the original Gosling’s recipe, made with their legendary barrel-aged blended Caribbean rum that started it all.

 

Gosling’s Dark ‘n’ Stormy
1.5 ounces Gosling’s Black Seal Rum
4 to 5 ounces ginger beer

In a highball glass filled with ice, add the ginger beer and top with rum for the classic stormy look. Garnish with a lime wedge and enjoy – preferably while out on the water. Cheers!