0 comments on “Thanksgiving Recipe: Tuscan-Style Turkey Porchetta”

Thanksgiving Recipe: Tuscan-Style Turkey Porchetta

By Executive Chef Kathryn Kelly

This recipe is one that was inspired from the many meals I’ve enjoyed in the heart of Tuscany. I love this recipe for Thanksgiving or a special harvest dish during autumn. When I serve this on a bed of polenta with a glass of Chianti, I transport myself back to a little farmhouse in Chiusa where I first experimented with this dish.

I prefer to leave the skin on the turkey breast, as it enhances the flavor immensely, but you can certainly prepare it without the skin if you wish. You may want to add a touch of butter or pecorino cheese to the prepared polenta for additional flavor. Originally a chicken recipe that I adapted for Thanksgiving, you can certainly choose to prepare it with chicken breasts – either way, I can promise you the evidence of your efforts won’t last very long. My guests always rave about this dish! 

 Serves 4

Ingredients

Stuffing
½ cup grated celeriac
½ cup grated parsnip
¼ cup chopped toasted walnuts
2 tablespoons dried cranberries, softened in hot water
1 tablespoon finely chopped sage
1 tablespoon finely chopped rosemary
2 teaspoons minced garlic
1 teaspoon truffle oil

Turkey
4 boneless, skinless turkey breasts
8 slices prosciutto

Sage Butter
3 tablespoons butter
8 sage leaves

Directions

Mix the Stuffing
In a medium bowl, combine all ingredients and mix well.

Prepare the Turkey
Preheat the oven to 350°F/177°C. Place each turkey breast, one at a time, in a large zip-lock bag and gently pound to a thickness of ½ inch.

On a work surface lined with parchment paper, lay out the prosciutto in 4 stacks of 2 pieces each. Place a turkey breast on top of each prosciutto stack, making sure the ends of the breasts are within the ends of the prosciutto. Place one-fourth of the stuffing on each breast. Roll the turkey and prosciutto tightly around the stuffing. Place the rolled turkey, seam side down, in a baking pan. Bake until the turkey reaches an internal temperature of 162°F/72°C.

Infuse the Butter
In a small sauté pan over medium heat, melt the butter. Add the sage and infuse the butter for about 5 minutes. Remove the sage and reserve for garnish.

To Serve
Drizzle with sage butter and garnish with sage leaves. Try pairing this turkey with creamy polenta with cranberries, and enjoy!

 

0 comments on “Steeped: Traditional Tea Culture in Asia
 

Steeped: Traditional Tea Culture in Asia
 

Though often linked with England, scones and clotted cream, a variety of rich legends about the origin of tea exist throughout Asia, highlighting its deep cultural ties to the continent. According to one Chinese legend, Emperor Shen accidentally made the first cup of tea nearly 5,000 years ago, when he was purifying water beneath the shade of a tea tree and a few dried leaves blew into his pot.

Here’s a brief glimpse at tea traditions across Asia:

China
First prospering during the Tang Dynasty and considered one of the seven Chinese necessities, tea has a storied history in China. Teahouses, tea ceremonies, and everyday tea are all elements embedded in Chinese culture. Green tea makes the most popular choice, prized for its health benefits. Notably, cups of tea in China are never served full – it’s considered impolite.

India
As the world’s second-largest tea grower, tea is popular throughout India, brewed both at home and at ubiquitous tea stalls. Masala chai, black tea with a blend of spices such as cinnamon, ginger and green cardamom, is traditionally served at breakfast and during the evening, with warmed milk and sugar.

Japan
Formal Japanese tea ceremonies date back to the 16th century, and are still practiced throughout the country. The secular rituals feature Matcha tea, a type of stone ground green tea, served in special ceramic ware and traditional Japanese sweets to balance the bitterness of the tea.

Afternoon Tea On Board
During your next voyage with Oceania Cruises, embrace the ancient tradition of tea and sample artisanal teas during Afternoon Tea from our signature tea collection, which in addition to classics such as English breakfast and Earl Grey, includes an array of more exotic black, herbal, green and white teas.


BLACK TEA
Orchid Vanilla
Madagascar vanilla, coconut slivers, luxurious, indulging

HERBAL TEA
Ginger Lemongrass
Spring lemongrass, soft ginger, balanced, invigorating

GREEN TEA
China Gunpowder
Hand-rolled green tea leaves, aromatic oils, grassy, stimulating

WHITE TEA
White Ginger Pear
Japanese pear, hint of ginger, exotic, alluring

0 comments on “Jacques Pépin’s Favorite Dishes On Board
 

Jacques Pépin’s Favorite Dishes On Board
 

A culinary legend among legends, Master Chef Jacques Pépin was the personal chef to three French heads of state, wrote an encyclopedic guide to French cooking that has become a classic among professional chefs, has charmed an entire nation with his many PBS cooking series – and as you may know, has been our Executive Culinary Director since the beginning. Curious about what this culinary guru and beloved chef orders when he dines aboard our ships? Us too. We sat down with him to find out which dishes catch his eye time and time again.


 

The Grand Dining Room
The surf and turf is one of my favorites. Beautiful filet mignon with great lobster tail. And you can’t find it done better in any of the restaurants in New York, you know.

Jacques Bistro (at The Grand Dining Room during lunch)
Salade Niçoise with a glass of rosé, of course!


 

Jacques
At my namesake restaurant, there is no great food without great wine. A little bit of Bordeaux has to go with it. I have to have escargot, of course – that classic French dish. The bouillabaisse is a favorite and we also have beautiful roast chicken – a must. For dessert, I like to go with the baba au rhum, which is like a very nice sponge cake soaked in dark rum.

Terrace Café
When it’s in the evening, I have the tapas, which I love, and the paella is terrific with the rice and saffron different types of shrimp in it and chorizo. The prosciutto is excellent, and there is always terrific cheese available.


 

Red Ginger
I always enjoy the lobster pad Thai. It’s become an Oceania Cruises favorite for a very good reason.

Polo Grill
Polo Grill is one of my favorite restaurants since I love steak. I mean I’ve had veal shank here, a grilled veal shank which was really extraordinary. And the Angus steak – you can’t beat that. It’s aged properly; it’s done right. You will never be disappointed with a baked potato here or with the prosciutto and melon or shrimp cocktail to start. You can tell it’s one of my favorites, no?


 

Toscana
So you know in a place like Toscana, a real Italian restaurant, there is a great array of pasta and you really can’t go wrong. I mean from linguine cioppino, linguine with clams and black mussels and shrimp to the ravioli, and then there is the gnocchi …the gnocchi with the pesto which is just out of this world – the best that I’ve ever had. I also really enjoy the carpaccio, you know the fillet of beef very thinly sliced with fresh basil on top. I mean all I can say is – it’s an embarrassment of riches.

1 comment on “NEW: Lunchtime Fare Available at The Bistro on All Ships”

NEW: Lunchtime Fare Available at The Bistro on All Ships

 

Debuted with great acclaim aboard Sirena in 2016, The Bistro is being introduced aboard our other five ships – Regatta, Insignia, Nautica, Marina and Riviera. Offered every day during lunch at The Grand Dining Room, you can enjoy cherished lunchtime staples from The Grand Dining Room that are “always available”, along with daily-changing regional specialties on the new The Bistro menu.

A sampling of some of Jacques Pépin’s favorite bistro-style dishes like the crisp Salade Niçoise and a warm Croque-Monsieur accompanied by the perfect glass of wine such as a refreshing Coteaux du Languedoc rosé offer the perfect way to be French for the afternoon, anywhere in the world over.

Big, Bold Flavors From Around The Globe
Lunchtime at The Bistro also offers 14 new Taste of the World selections from Cuba, Mexico, Scandinavia, Italy, Asia, Greece, France, Lebanon, Spain, Morocco, England, Philippines, the Caribbean, and India. Each Taste of the World dish offers a selection of six different local or regional specialties that have been inspired by our culinary team member’s roots and their travels, and can be ordered as an entrée or as an appetizer that is perfect for sharing. Some of the more off-the-beaten-path dishes that guests will find include pickled vegetables and roasted lemongrass chicken from the Philippines, lamb kefta from Lebanon, aubergine chickpea salad from Morocco, and marinated herring with polar bread from Scandinavia.

“The Bistro offers the ultimate combination of lunchtime Grand Dining Room classics that our guests have known and loved and is now infused with Jacques Pépin’s hallmark specialties from France and around the world, to create an afternoon experience that will become an instant favorite,” stated Bob Binder, President & CEO of Oceania Cruises.

The Bistro is currently available aboard Insignia and Riviera and will be available aboard Regatta, Nautica, Marina, and Sirena by the end of March 2018. View sample menus here.

1 comment on “Inside Aussie Cuisine With Our Chefs”

Inside Aussie Cuisine With Our Chefs

Kakadu plums, native pepperberries, bush tomatoes, emu and crocodile are just a few items that might be stocking the galley when we sail the land Down Under, Senior Culinary Director Eric Barale shared. What exactly defines Australian cuisine?

While the cuisine found among the islands of the South Pacific focuses on fresh seafood complemented by local fruits and vegetables, Australian cuisine is much more difficult to pinpoint. With a confluence of indigenous dishes, known as bush tucker, plus vast European and Asian influences, the cuisine takes on as many personalities as the continent itself.

Melting Pot of Global Flavors
From quondong and Anzac biscuits to meat pies and dim sum, Australian cuisine is a true melting pot of indigenous ingredients, homegrown creations and far-flung influences spanning centuries. During Australia’s gold rushes in the 1850s, an influx of European and American immigrants spurred the development of a coffee culture and British imports like meat pies and Cornish pasties. Chinese food was also introduced during this period, proliferating in the 1860s and 1870s, especially in the port cities – and now dim sum is nearly considered a national dish. Another wave of immigrants in the late 1940s after World War II introduced a much broader array of influences, ingredients and flavors from all over Europe, and in particular Italy and Greece. Meanwhile, a continual influx of immigrants from East and Southeast Asia has firmly solidified Australia’s reputation for excellent, authentic Asian cuisine.

Seafood, of course, has also long been popular in Aussie kitchens, especially native fish like barramundi and Tasmanian salmon. According to Barale, Moreton Bay bugs, a type of flat lobster-like crustacean, are a very typical Australian dish cooked on the barbecue.

“Perhaps not as well-known as shrimp on the barbecue or Pavlova, Moreton Bay bugs are delicious drizzled with a little olive oil or butter and cooked on the barbecue in their shell,” Barale said.

A Bite of Bush Tucker
Aboriginal Australians represent one of the oldest living cultures on Earth, and their influence on culinary traditions is still present today. In fact, Fleet Corporate Executive Chef Franck Garanger notes that Aboriginal influences are on the rise in the contemporary Aussie restaurant scene and that native Australian dishes, or bush tucker, are featured on board when sailing this region.

“As in other parts of the world there is a return to the indigenous culinary traditions for inspiration. We bring this to life on board with native dishes and traditional, local ingredients like akudjura which is a seasoning made from ground bush tomatoes and lemon myrtle which we use in sauces and dressing,” Garanger said.

Depending on the chef ’s inspiration, you might try Wildfire-Spiced Tasmanian Trout
on Paperbark-Smoked Kipfler Mash topped with Pineapple and Riberry Salsa or
perhaps something a bit more simple like Oysters Outback and a Sydney Salad with
emu prosciutto.

Regardless of what you choose, you’ll enjoy a delicious taste of Australia on board
our ships and ashore in sought-after destinations across this fascinating continent. Cheers, mate!