0 comments on “Recipe: Pomelo Banh Trang Rolls
 

Recipe: Pomelo Banh Trang Rolls
 

By Executive Chef & Director of Culinary Enrichment Kathryn Kelly

These fresh spring rolls are perfect for the last hot days of summer. Similar to rolling sushi, the assembly of these rolls is fun and easy. You need slightly damp hands to keep the rice paper from sticking to your fingers. I’ve put my own twist on the Vietnamese banh trang rolls we serve at Red Ginger, and you can easily experiment with different ingredients and create your own version at home.

Serves 4

MIANG DIPPING SAUCE
1 cup palm sugar
½ cup water
1 Thai chili
¼ cup coconut flakes, toasted
¼ cup crushed macadamia nuts
1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
2 teaspoons ginger juice

POMELO ROLLS
Segments of 4 pomelos
¼ cup coconut flakes, toasted
¼ cup salted dry-roasted peanuts, finely crushed
2 tablespoons finely minced shallot
8 Thai basil leaves, chiffonade
8 mint leaves, chiffonade
8 rice paper rounds
8 butter lettuce leaves
8 chive stems

MAKE THE SAUCE
In a small saucepan over medium heat, combine the sugar, water and chili and warm, stirring occasionally, until the sugar dissolves. Remove from the heat and stir in the remaining ingredients. Let cool and divide among 4 small bowls.

PREPARE THE ROLLS
In a medium bowl, combine the pomelo segments, coconut, peanuts, shallot, basil and mint. Soak a rice
paper in lukewarm water until soft and then lay out on a damp kitchen towel. Top with a lettuce leaf and one-eighth of the pomelo mixture. Roll up the rice paper like a burrito or gather up the edges to form a pouch. Tie with a chive stem. Repeat to make 8 rolls and serve with the dipping sauce.

0 comments on “Jacques Pépin’s Favorite Dishes On Board
 

Jacques Pépin’s Favorite Dishes On Board
 

A culinary legend among legends, Master Chef Jacques Pépin was the personal chef to three French heads of state, wrote an encyclopedic guide to French cooking that has become a classic among professional chefs, has charmed an entire nation with his many PBS cooking series – and as you may know, has been our Executive Culinary Director since the beginning. Curious about what this culinary guru and beloved chef orders when he dines aboard our ships? Us too. We sat down with him to find out which dishes catch his eye time and time again.


 

The Grand Dining Room
The surf and turf is one of my favorites. Beautiful filet mignon with great lobster tail. And you can’t find it done better in any of the restaurants in New York, you know.

Jacques Bistro (at The Grand Dining Room during lunch)
Salade Niçoise with a glass of rosé, of course!


 

Jacques
At my namesake restaurant, there is no great food without great wine. A little bit of Bordeaux has to go with it. I have to have escargot, of course – that classic French dish. The bouillabaisse is a favorite and we also have beautiful roast chicken – a must. For dessert, I like to go with the baba au rhum, which is like a very nice sponge cake soaked in dark rum.

Terrace Café
When it’s in the evening, I have the tapas, which I love, and the paella is terrific with the rice and saffron different types of shrimp in it and chorizo. The prosciutto is excellent, and there is always terrific cheese available.


 

Red Ginger
I always enjoy the lobster pad Thai. It’s become an Oceania Cruises favorite for a very good reason.

Polo Grill
Polo Grill is one of my favorite restaurants since I love steak. I mean I’ve had veal shank here, a grilled veal shank which was really extraordinary. And the Angus steak – you can’t beat that. It’s aged properly; it’s done right. You will never be disappointed with a baked potato here or with the prosciutto and melon or shrimp cocktail to start. You can tell it’s one of my favorites, no?


 

Toscana
So you know in a place like Toscana, a real Italian restaurant, there is a great array of pasta and you really can’t go wrong. I mean from linguine cioppino, linguine with clams and black mussels and shrimp to the ravioli, and then there is the gnocchi …the gnocchi with the pesto which is just out of this world – the best that I’ve ever had. I also really enjoy the carpaccio, you know the fillet of beef very thinly sliced with fresh basil on top. I mean all I can say is – it’s an embarrassment of riches.

0 comments on “Recipe: South Pacific-Style Coconut Ice Cream
 

Recipe: South Pacific-Style Coconut Ice Cream
 

There’s nothing like ice cream with a tropical flair to cool you down on a hot summer day. This creamy coconut ice cream recipe gets its inspiration from the gorgeous South Pacific islands where coconuts reign supreme and infuse the cuisine with that irresistibly sweet, rich and aromatic flavor. For this recipe, be sure to use cream of coconut and not coconut milk – the islanders would not be happy with you!

CREAMY COCONUT ICE CREAM
Makes 1 quart

INGREDIENTS
1 cup whole milk
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup cream of coconut
1 cup sweetened coconut, freshly flaked
1 cinnamon stick
8 egg yolks
1 ½ cups extra fine sugar
¼ cup toasted coconut flakes

PREPARATION
Bring milk, heavy cream, cream of coconut and coconut flakes to a simmer in a heavy saucepan. Add the cinnamon stick and allow to steep for 10 minutes. Return to low heat and hold.

Whisk the egg yolks and sugar together until the sugar dissolves. Temper the warm milk mixture into the egg yolks, adding a small amount at a time. Return the mixture to the saucepan and stir constantly over low heat until it thickens. Strain through a chinois to remove the cinnamon stick and coconut flakes. Chill over an ice bath. Place in an ice cream machine and churn until you reach the desired consistency. Top with toasted coconut flakes.

0 comments on “Food of the Gods: Greek Ingredients
 

Food of the Gods: Greek Ingredients
 

By Restaurant Manager Georgios Korakianitis

With influences from Turkey to Italy, Greece has a vast and unique culinary landscape that has captivated a global audience. In Greece, bread, olives and olive oil are the pillars of the Greek table wherever you travel, from an upscale restaurant in Athens to a farmhouse on Crete. You’ll have a hard time finding a family gathered around a table without this trio, not to mention a
fresh bottle of wine.

 

What many travelers do not realize is that Greek cuisine not only features many typical Middle
Eastern foods, but is also strongly influenced by Rome, tracing back to when the Romans
conquered Greece in the 2nd century. So you’ll see plenty of pasta and sauces alongside yogurt, rice
and rich sweets made from nuts, honey and sesame seeds. Arab influences have also left their mark on the southern region of Greece, which means you’ll see spices such as cumin, cinnamon, allspice and cloves in the dishes. Greek coffee, of course, traces its roots to Turkey, while potatoes
and tomatoes were brought from the New World after European explorers landed in the Americas.

In Greece using local ingredients isn’t a trend, it’s simply how we cook – using what is in season
and what is available in our region. Every Greek meal is fresh and inviting, but it also takes you on a journey through Greece’s history and thousands of years of growing, cooking and eating. As you
will discover once you sit down to eat in Greece, no meal is ever “just a meal” – our celebration of life and dining is one in the same. So I invite you to discover more about just a few of the many Greek ingredients featured on board that capture the essence of our joyful and timeless cuisine.

 

Feta Cheese
The national cheese of Greece, feta, can only be produced in Greece – and only in specific regions such as the Peloponnese, Lesvos and mainland Greece – due to its Protected Designation of Origin. By law, feta is produced from either 100% sheep’s milk or a combination of sheep’s and goat’s milk. It’s the crowning centerpiece on any Greek salad and is a key ingredient in traditional dishes such as spanakopita and feta saganaki – a delicious filo-wrapped feta drenched in honey and coated in sesame.

Caper Leaves
Very difficult to find outside of Greece, caper leaves are typically pickled or boiled and then preserved in jars with brine, similar to caper berries. In fact, when our ships leave Greece, we purchase enough caper leaves to last until the ship is planning to return. Our chefs like to use them
in fish dishes and salads, such as the heirloom tomato salad.

Capers
A bold and briny ingredient, capers are picked, cured and sorted according to size. Harvesting
capers is an arduous process since they can only be picked by hand every spring. They are ideal
for garnishing and add a punch of flavor to sauces, salads, pasta dishes, fish and lamb. We
use them most often on board in our featured Greek fish at the Chef ’s Greek Market Dinner, as well as in a variety of pasta dishes and salads.

 

Kalamata Olives
This king of Greek table olives is favored around the world. The almond-shaped, deep purple
olive is noted for its rich tangy flavor that is often smoky or has hints of wine. Kalamata olives are typically left on the tree to mature a bit longer and are only harvested once their color begins to turn dark. They are usually stored in olive oil or vinegar, and are typical in Greek salads and make a great tapenade.

Filo Dough
Filo dough is an unleavened tissue-thin dough that is stretched or rolled so thin you can see through it. This type of dough is very versatile since it can be layered, filled, folded, rolled and even turned into cups, flowers or spirals. On board, we use filo in various Greek recipes such as baklava and spanakopita, as well as dishes like strudel, pastilla and tartlets. Filo-based pastries are made by layering many sheets of filo brushed with olive oil or butter, filling them and then baking.

Come live the Greek life with us in the Mediterranean this summer!

0 comments on “Our Sommelier’s Picks Down Under
 

Our Sommelier’s Picks Down Under
 

With more than 60 recognized regions, Australia is in a thriving Southern Hemisphere location for winemaking. Whether you’re planning a cruise Down Under or looking for a fresh bottle for dinner tonight, Australia has so much to offer wine lovers. Without a doubt, shiraz is one of Australia’s best-known and most loved varietals. Two of our Sommelier’s favorite picks are below – and you can enjoy them on board by the bottle.

Two Hands Lily’s Garden Shiraz, McLaren Vale, Australia
Two Hands has earned a place in the Wine Spectator Top 100 Wines for ten years in a row, the only winery in the world to ever achieve this feat. Two Hands Lily’s Garden Shiraz comes from the estate’s Garden Series, which is their premium range of shiraz from the finest shiraz growing regions in Australia. In fact, Lily’s Garden Shiraz is the pick of the bunch, sourced from Two Hands McLaren Vale vineyards.

Tasting Notes: This generous wine is characterized by cascading blue fruits and a rich long palate. It’s a deep, intense red with a purple hue and notes of blueberry, plum and mulberry. Hints of French lavender, white pepper and warm granite add complexity.

Peter Lehmann Barossa Portrait Shiraz, Barossa Valley, Australia
Barossa Valley is one of Australia’s oldest regions for fine wine and is a fairly warm region renowned for its robust Shiraz. Peter Lehmann shiraz is true to the varietal style, embodying a balanced and full-bodied character.

Tasting Notes: This full-bodied Barossa shiraz reveals a deep color and bouquet of dark forest fruits with a hint of chocolate and vanilla. Soft, velvety tannins with a lingering mocha finish make it a perfect companion to roast meats and strong cheeses.

Cheers!