Parades, kite-flying, torch-running – freedom festivities take shape in many ways. As millions of Americans prepare to celebrate Independence Day, honoring the declaration of independence from Great Britain in 1776, we’re taking a look at other countries’ days of freedom and how they celebrate.

1Happy Birthday Canada | July 1

Canada’s Independence Day is frequently referred to as “Canada’s birthday” or “Canada Day.” This event marks the union of the British North American colonies of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and the Province of Canada into a federation of four provinces (the Province of Canada being divided, in the process, into Ontario and Quebec) on July 1, 1867. Canadians celebrate their Independence very similar to that of the U.S. with parades, fireworks, summer picnics and a whole host of other fun activities.

2Grito do Ipiranga | September 7

Brazil won its freedom after Portuguese prince Dom Pedro I declared it independent from his father’s rule on September 7, 1822, in one of the most peaceful Latin American revolutions. The Brazilians did not have to go to war for their independence; the King himself declared in the Grito do Ipiranga, “By my blood, by my honor, and by God: I will make Brazil free” with the motto “Independence or Death!”

On this day, thousands of Brazilians gather throughout the streets to celebrate with banners, balloons and streamers. They proudly fly their flag, sing songs and enjoy the day with their friends and families.

India Flies As Free As the Wind | August 15

India won their independence on August 15, 1947, after more than 200 years of British colonial rule. To celebrate their freedom, saffron, white and emerald-green kites evoking the young country’s tri-colored flag are flown all over, and parades and pageants are also popular.

3Arriba Mexico | September 16

On September 16, Mexico will celebrate 203 years of independence, since the legendary priest Miguel Hidalgo sounded “El Grito de la Independencia” – a cry for freedom that set in motion the Mexican War of Independence from Spain. Mexico’s celebrations start the night of the 15th and carry on into the next day. Some of the traditions include the national military parade, which marches through various memorials, the ringing of the National Palace bell in Mexico City, fireworks, civic festivals and family gatherings.

Guatemala, Honduras & Beyond: Freedom for All | September 15

Inspired by the results of Spain’s defeat in the Mexican War for Independence, Guatemala declared all of Central America free on September 15, 1821. Beginning in Guatemala City and ending in Costa Rica’s former colonial capital Cartago, the “running of the torch” relay is still a much-loved Independence Day tradition and attracts large crowds every year.

Happy 4th of July from all of us at Oceania Cruises!