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Panama Canal Sunset

No matter how lofty your goals for the New Year, they will seem easily attainable compared to the remarkable effort that went into constructing the Panama Canal. Guests on board Regatta are getting a firsthand look at this incredible feat of mankind today as they ring in the New Year with Oceania Cruises.

One of the wonders of the modern world, the Panama Canal was completed in 1914 and changed maritime travel in the Western Hemisphere. Before the 50-mile canal was built, ships sailing from eastern coasts of the Americas to the west coasts had to sail around the southernmost tip of South America.

As simple and ingenious as the system might seem today, this canal was an extraordinary project in the making. As far back as the 16th century, when explorers first discovered the Isthmus of Panama, they began imagining a canal that would shave thousands of miles off their journeys. The French began the project in the late 1800s but found building a sea-level canal in the mountainous terrain of Panama beyond the engineering know-how of that time. In 1903, when the United States stepped in, it became clear the only way to get ships across the continental divide was to devise a system of locks that would raise ships above sea level.

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To give you an idea of the Herculean effort required to complete this task, here are some astounding facts and figures about the project:

  • Over 56,000 people were employed to complete the project between 1904 and 1913
  • Total construction cost was $375,000,000
  • The French and the US cleared over 70,000,000 tons of material
  • More than 14,000 tons of explosives were used

Once the project was completed (two years ahead of schedule, I might add), a ship could travel from coast to coast in 8 to 10 hours. Entering from the Pacific side, the Miraflores Locks progressively lift ships 54 feet to Miraflores Lake. The Pedro Miguel Lock then lifts ships another 31 feet. After sailing nearly 8 miles through Gaillard Cut and 15 miles crossing Gatun Lake, the Gatun Locks drop ships in three stages down to the level of the Atlantic.

Today Regatta makes her transit through the Panama Canal in the daylight hours, so guests will have the opportunity to see the machinations of this ingenious system up close. They can also observe the progress on the massive multibillion-dollar expansion project that is underway, which is expected to double the capacity of the canal when the project is completed in 2015. The transit provides great views of the surrounding countryside as well, and the evening hours promise a beautiful sunset along the way.

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As the Panama Canal enters its 100th year with an eye towards future expansion, Oceania Cruises winds down a momentous 2013 celebrating 10 years at sea and likewise looks forward to many new milestones in 2014. If you are like me, more travel is one of your New Year’s resolutions, so I hope to cross paths with you on one of the ships of Oceania Cruises. In the meantime, we wish you a happy New Year filled with joy and journeys to wondrous destinations!

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